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hi ive been tying for about 2 weeks and looking for some output. i dont mind hard critisism lol. here are a few flies ive been tying. sorry i know the pictures arnt the best my camera broke and had to use my web cam...
 

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Hi Kevin..
It's really hard to see the chironies..but from what I can see they look OK...the wet flies also look aof,the wiskers are a bit large ,but might help balance the fly underwater..
C
 

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I would suggest showing your flies to the best judges there are, fish. I loving tying flies, and the year I started I tried tying every pattern I could. It was great practice but I found that I tied many with mistakes that only became apparent when they hit the water. I have found the best times to tie flies when you are learning is around the same time you are using them. Tie up a bunch, head out fishing to try them out, remember what works what doesn't want looks good in the water what doesn't (which ones fell apart). Then go back to you bench and tie again, fixing problems with the last batch or improving what you had tied before. One thing I did to learn was to pick up a couple flies I thought were interesting at the local fly shop, ask the guy behind the counter what materials I needed to tie them (if I didn't already know), go home and try tying them for myself. This way you can compare right against the original.
Happy tying.
 

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Kevin, the pictures are quite blurry, and that makes criticism more problematic. I understand that your camera is DOA, but still I would suggest you take your time to set up and take your pictures, just as you do tying your flies. You don't need a $1000 SLR camera to take decent photos (it is great if you do have one), a simple point and shoot will work fine. If possible, use a tripod. You can pick up a cheapie for around $20-$30 that will do everything you want. Ones at this price point are not robust, and will fail if you are packing them around and using them daily, but for a set-up in one room they are fine. If you want you can also go to a photo shop and buy a Gorillapod by Joby http://joby.com/gorillapod
These are again pretty cheap (I don't remember for sure, but i think I bought mine, the smallest one, for under $40). You can go to Micheal's (or any art/craft store) and buy a sheet (approx 2' x 3') of black, blue, or whatever colour poster paper. Tacked up, or clamped to some support this will provide a neutral background for your shot, and will cost you a buck or 2. Finally, I like to throw 2 or more lights (bright ones) on the fly. even the cheapest point and shoots these days have settings to white balance your shot, and the few seconds they take to set up, the better the colour quality of your final picture.
I hope to see more of your efforts, and I hope they are easier to critique in the future. From what I can tell, SalaR hit it right. The chronies seem to be proportioned well (although I don't bother using gills on a white bead headed chironomid-the bead seems to do the trick fine on its own), but the Spratleys seem kinda heavy. While Tieflier's suggestion of buying a few sample flies and then imitating them, in my eyes, most commercially tied flies (not johnk's but the off shore ones) are usually too heavily dressed. When it comes to fishing, my experience is that it is harder to under dress a fly than it is to over dress one. That is the problem with the Spratleys. Try reducing the beard to 8-12 fibres, tied so they flare and separate slightly. Do the same with the tail. You'll get more movement in the fibres and more interest from the fish.
 

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Ya, hard to see - make sure you are using your macro setting.
Also, turn off your flash and instead make sure there is sufficient ambient lighting.

But I agree with TieFlier - the fish are really the judge and jury - it's amazing what they will hit and what they will ignore. Often butt ugly and all beat up works better than a neat and tidy perfectly tied pattern.

Keep posting though.
 

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Good skinny chironomids and I do like to see the tiny bit of gill material whether the bead is white or not. I tie some with and some not just in case there is a difference on the water. I admit I have so far seen no difference however.

As to the Doc Spratleys, I agree with what was said above. One added comment might be to ensure the length of the tail is the same distance as that of your hook gap and keep it sparse as well as both the wing and the beard, as mentioned above. My personal preference would be to use a somewhat shorter beard as well, however I also tie size 12 spratley flies and the beard sometimes reaches close to the hook point on those with no perceived difference in catching fish.

For some reason where I fish, I have found the better success to be using green seal fur for the dubbing on some, and a maroon seal fur dubbing mix on others. I have also tied some with silver tinsel and some in gold as well as some using red holographic tinsel. At times one or the other is preferred although I have never been certain why that might be.

You might also want to try to find out more about the Bill Nation's 'Nation’s Fancy, 'Silver-tip' and 'Special' as I have found them to be very good at times when my spratleys I have did not work as well although they are similar.

At times I also add a very small amount of crystal flash in the underwing...like not more than two or three strands. This seems to make a bit of difference in our northern waters if the visiblity is low.
 

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But I agree with TieFlier - the fish are really the judge and jury - it's amazing what they will hit and what they will ignore. Often butt ugly and all beat up works better than a neat and tidy perfectly tied pattern.
For sure, fishing with trashed flies always seems to produce more for me as well. Ive had a few flies where they got so beat up the tinsel unwound and was trailing behind the fly and thats all the fish would hit. Just keep on tying up flies and getting them in the water. If you have a fly at the end of the day and not just a bare hook it probably means you did a good job.
 
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