BC Fly Fishing Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

















what yall think. the goods and that bads, I shouldv put black eyes on the red one and my fly rod accidently got ran over its got a split in it dont think it can be repaired
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
id like to aswell but i need a new rod 1st. IM GETN A SNOWBEE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! unless i can repair myn but i dont think so
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,702 Posts
I am curious to know what "bugs" these various creations are meant to imitate, or indicate. While not all flies are meant to replicate specific insects or invertabrates, even attractors are designed using materials, colours, proportions and shapes that at least indicate the likelihood that the fly is a food item. As fish age and mature, they learn what food items look like and how they behave in general terms at least. They will not expend energy moving to eat something that does not possess certain attributes. For this reason, flies are designed to present one or more of these attributes to a wary fish. While I am certain that this collection will entice some action, I think you are likely to get smaller, less experienced fish coming to hand than you are their larger, warier big brothers. There is a reason so many of us spend countless hours following patterns and recipes others have shown to be effective fish attractors, before we step into the world of designing our own flies. There are principles and materials to learn that will always make the tyer more proficient and successful. It is a good idea to get a fly tying book (complete with pictures) and learn to tie the patterns in it. Practice and application will make your flies more coherent and less like a bunch of material thrown on a hook.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
That makes sense. I quit buying flies though cuz i wasnt catching fish with any of them, or just the odd grab. these arnt the ones I usualy use. my old man told me he use to do good with the larvy/caddis/ waterbuggy kind of stuff. usualy I always use the floaty bugs. so with the top one it started out I was going for a wooly bugger sort of thing. then i clipped it and gave it eyes. clipping with the intention of givving it a juicy bug shape. THe next one I just started freestyling LOL. the one below that with the feathers sticking out I thought might giv it nice movement in the water. The red one i was going for a crayfish or somthing along those lines with pinchers. and the bottom bug I htought came out really good. exept maby the eyes a little on the large side
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I've learned that if I'm not catching anything with a traditional pattern, it is usually one of:
- My technique is bad, ie, poor presentation
- I am not reading the water well and Need to move.
- I have selected the wrong fly to match what the fish are keying on
- Etc, etc

There is nothing wrong with tweaking patterns or inventing your own, but if you're doing it to improve your catch rate, odds are that's not the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
I've learned that if I'm not catching anything with a traditional pattern, it is usually one of:
- My technique is bad, ie, poor presentation
- I am not reading the water well and Need to move.
- I have selected the wrong fly to match what the fish are keying on
- Etc, etc

There is nothing wrong with tweaking patterns or inventing your own, but if you're doing it to improve your catch rate, odds are that's not the problem.

Well said. Presentation is paramount in increasing your catch rate. Having your fly in "the kitchen" and presenting it in a fashion that emulates the movement and appearance of a natural food source. For example if the fish are targetting emerging damsels 6" under the surface, fishing chironomids at 15' is a lesson in futility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
ya i havnt got to use any of those fellas yet. the foirst one i bust out will probably be the kitchen fly if there surfacing. at one of the lakes I go there are alot of horsflys and deer flies around. that ones like geration 2 of my flies. the other flylike bug i do is all deer hair cut strategically. when tying the kitchen fly I actualy was going for more a dragonfly caddis looking thing. was trying it on a smaller hook to see how it turn out. then i thought hmm mabey ill put som wings on
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
As fish age and mature, they learn what food items look like and how they behave in general terms at least. They will not expend energy moving to eat something that does not possess certain attributes. For this reason, flies are designed to present one or more of these attributes to a wary fish. While I am certain that this collection will entice some action, I think you are likely to get smaller, less experienced fish coming to hand than you are their larger, warier big brothers.
As I've improved and started to deliberately target larger fish this couldn't hold more true. A lake is like a microcosm of the theory of natural selection in that sense. There are always on and off days, but for the most part with a basic knowledge of fly fishing anyone can move into a well structured shoal on an ice-free lake (not in turnover :p ) and at the very least see a lot of action on his fly from little feeder pan-frys. But obviously a big fish is big for a reason, he hasn't died yet. That may not directly translate into the knowledge that a poorly presented fly is on the end of my tippet to that fish, but I honestly think it's a part of the bigger picture.

Crapsterface you're showing you obviously are skilled at tying, which is half the battle but again I'll stress the popular opinion. Follow recipes! I personally find myself becoming a strictly "old school" patterns tyer. I find that there are few flies out there that are more dependable than a tom thumb, a doc spratley, a carey special, a hare's ear nymph and other similarly classic patterns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
264 Posts
I like them all! The second one could do well as a caddis emerger if tied in the right sizes. The others could all work good for damsels and dragon nymphs. The first is my favorite though, fished on a full sink line with a dead slow retrieve would probably be awesome!
 

·
Scott
Joined
·
1,589 Posts
Ha! Great job!

I've kinda followed the same approach as you in tying. I started off learning some of the classic patterns, and as I learned some of the techniques I'd play around with modifying them. Mostly just for kicks, I used to build a lot of models growing up and I think it's the design factor I enjoy mostly about fly tying. Having said that when I hit the rivers, I usually end up using the classic patterns.

Slowly but surely I'm building a collection, and it sure is a lot more rewarding when you get a strike on a fly you've tied then one purchased at a store.

Great work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thx. most ofthe time i go for somthing more realistic looking. I know sm of them chang in the water and whatnot. but I thnki im happier catching my limit in the 14 inch range and the odd biggun here and there then waiting all day or all week for that one big one. Iv always done way better on my own that look more realistic. i havnt fished a classic in years up until ppl in here told me about the classics and how they work. but i still wasnt getn much so i thew my classics back on lol. perhaps I need som classical bug trainng.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
I like new ideas that come from people like crapster who just "do what feels right" (yet I usually fish the classics, lol).

I agree with the second being an emerging Caddis - maybe trim the hackle so there are just a few "legs" sticking out on the underside only, and rough up the spun hair body ( I tied one similar with a brown feather palmered aroung the body, then trimmed to be just longer than the deer hair)

I also think the red one would make an excellent crawdad for bass on the fly, but I would tie it backwards, so the big protruding "claws" are on the business end. The black eyes would also help the effect.

Keep on innovating, but don't throw out the tried and tested patterns - each one has its uses, with proper technique and presentation they are great.....
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top