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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone done this with results in the dead of winter? It seems to me, this technique with a high stick method would open up a lot of water that would other wise be unfishable on the fly. I've tried it in the past with no luck. A heavier dressed fly to get down into that "winter zone" near the bottom I think would be in order. If so, how big of an indicator would be needed? Or better yet how big have have you seen used for this tactic? This is something that I'd be willing to give another try. I've fished with good results in the past for cuttys using the nymphing method, and small glo bugs. Anyhow just a thought. What are yours?

Finder:)
 

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low water

just ask the Jig fishers on the Gold...they have the answers...I have tried it on the Gold river's Lake Pool and had a little success,.....the slot just above the "bucket" on the Stamp is ideal for that in lower water...I picked up a 14 lb .Hatchery Doe on a #6 double beaded Stone(Black) ,leader about 15' on a Hardy Mach 1 Salmon line,Mid January several years ago. Fresh fish are less likely to pick up a bug.......but love flesh flies
 

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Hey F F i was just reading an article on that last night
they talked about using a special yarn as an indicator that floats real well
i will try to find it again and post the results
 

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here it is,
A floating indicator is needed to support the fly, guide the drift, and telegraph bites. My favorite indicator material is braided polyester macrame cord. To make one, cut off 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 inches of material; the length depends on the weight of your fly. Use just enough to support the fly without sinking the indicator. Separate the braided strands. Fasten the strands to a 3-5 foot leader (0X or heavier) with a clinch knot around the middle; the leader should be connected to a floating line.

Just above the indicator, tie a length of 1X or 2X tippet directly to the heavy leader with a clinch knot; ideally, this leader should be about six inches longer than the depth of the water. Dress the indicator heavily with fly floatant.

In this system, the indicator keeps the fly at a consistent depth. The right angle joint between the two leader sections helps the fly sink more quickly and drift more naturally. The thin tippet helps the fly sink faster.
 

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Ive had some success with glo bugging for steelhead in the past. I tried a bunch of different indicators, split shots and whatever, none of the "fly fishing" style indicators made of yarn or the tinny hollow plastic ones and the frog hair big ones really worked for me too well. One day I went by "on the way store" and I saw mini dink floats for sale. They worked awsome, you can pinch on 3 big gear fishing style split shots and they still float well. All I did for the rig was 8ft of 15lb surgeon knoted to 2 ft of 12lb ,slide the mini dink float onto the leader all the way up the leader, then I pinched on 2 or 3 large size gear fishing split shots above the surgeons knot so they dont slide down.Attach glo bug of choice to the tippet and adjust the float position according to depth. All the typical "fly fishing" mini style split shots and small indicators are uneffective when trying to get down to the fish in the pocket water, the rig I describe is just as effective at getting down and dirty as the gear guy fishing next to you.This is could be the most effective way to catch steelhead in the dead of winter on a fly rod, especially when most of the early vedder steelhead will be caught up top where water for swinging flies is limited. However, this kind of rig is a pain in the ass to cast.Also this rig is best used in slots that are withing 10-15ft from the shore,much further and the cast is almost impossible and controlling the dead drift becomes difficult.I fished this rig from the backside of the limit hole and down where all the pockets are in very close. In the end I decided that floats and split shots were alot easier and more pleasurable to fish with a gear rod, and since I only fish with fly rods I havent done this method for a number of years. I just swing flies now and accept that I probably wont hook up till mid Janurary. However glo buggin with this rig is very effective.
 

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nymph or gear

I watched with interest earlier in the week on the Stamp a guy was using similar method in high water conditions. Looked like a small balsa float with several small shot and a maribou fly.....Why not just use a lightweight Berkley rod with the same gear and a centerpin reel?....just curious.......Ortho
 

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I watched with interest earlier in the week on the Stamp a guy was using similar method in high water conditions. Looked like a small balsa float with several small shot and a maribou fly.....Why not just use a lightweight Berkley rod with the same gear and a centerpin reel?....just curious.......Ortho

Exactly! not trying to sound elitist or whatever some might call me but
why not use a gear rod and a float and a jig fly if u want to fish this way..it would be much more efficient that way.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Exactly! not trying to sound elitist or whatever some might call me but
why not use a gear rod and a float and a jig fly if u want to fish this way..it would be much more efficient that way.

Yes it would be much more efficient to use gear. But I'd much rather my fish come on the fly. I know some purists(nobody here) may frown when the word "indicator", is brought up.:D ;) Much the same as using them for chironomid fishing. After reading a few articles, and seeing this method used on a few shows on steelheading in rivers back east, I was curious and wondering what everyone's take, and experiences were, and to see if this method could infact be effective, out here for steelies. Even though our rivers are much larger and for the most part faster.

TimDog December 30th, 2006 06:03 AM
I just swing flies now and accept that I probably wont hook up till mid Janurary.
Yeh me too. Thanks for your input Tim;) Thanks for your input fellas.

Finder;)
 

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i can understand if the water tempertures dropped to extreme condition like the great lakes area but here in the pacific northwest with milder weather it's not that much of an issue to catch them on a swung fly.
 

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dish towels

It is kind of funny to listen to us as we discuss gear-fly fishing differences...and I must say that it is a battle that rages in me constantly. At times I find myself swinging large 6" leeches or Popsicles in all water conditions,Summer or Winter. For years Gerry Wentel has teased me about swinging "dish Towels" through the Lower Dean...although he did ask for a few ! Have you ever seen his fly box...all large beaded Stone flies! However, he may be correct, casting 650 Grain Skagit lines looped to a compensator looped to 16 feet of T-14. Would it not be easier to cast a lovely Sage 3113 'pin rod,a nice little Match-Areal centre pin reel,a few split shot and an egg pattern tied with synthetic wool....confuseing as hell but a great discussion...
As I said earlier in this thread...ask the Jig Fishers about Nymphing for Steelhead...we all have great ideas and shareing will help others with their techniques. I took a young doctor from Alberta out this past summer to One of my favorite remote rivers...for Summer Run Steelhead...A hour into our fishing I saw a few rising fish..I said to him dry fly time...notta,so ,I put on old reliable Intruder and told him to Put on a small beaded Caddis Nympt...crystal clear water ...I passed over these fish 4 or 5 times ..nothing .I beckoned for him to Nymph behind me...second drift he was into a 31" beautiful doe with Lice...water was about 6'deep along a stone wall...his line was a Rio DC 7' fast sink tip.
Versatile
 
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