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Stupid question again..........

I'm just new to flyfish, and the last Saturday I was on Allouette mouth for

casting practice.

It was my second time to go out with fly gear.

I cast around 30feet and that's it. So sad about this :(........

I'm using Fenwick HMX 908 rod and reel with freebee wf8 floating line from

fenwick and various sinking tips.

On the day, I was hit my ass and back by big steelhead fly a lot and hooked

my leg too.

Is there any good casting instruction on the web that I can learn??

Any comment, recommendation would be appreciated in advance~!!

Thanks~!!

Bravo!!!
 

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hi,

there are a few places on the net or in books to learn how but the best and fastest way to learn would be to hire a good casting instructor. Your learning curve will be much faster and less frustrating in the long run.
 

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I second Eric's sentiment. An hour with a casting instructor will save you many weeks (years) of frustration. The second thing is get out and practice. I would recommend that you put away the sink tips and just use a floating line for a good while. Avoid heavy, weighted flies while you are learning, even for seasoned casters these can be a problem. For practice it is often a good idea to use a hook with the point broken off or just a piece of wool tied to your tippet. VERY IMPORTANT: wear glasses or sunglasses (even safety glasses). That hook in the ass takes on a whole different meaning when it's a hook in the eye. Over the years I have managed to put one solidly in my nose and one through my earlobe. Too close to the eye for me not to be cautious.
Most important tho' is practice, practice, practice. Welcome to the light side. ;) ;)
 

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Aside from agreeing with the 2 previous posts, I would say if you're hitting yourself in the back that much, you are dropping your back cast. Forget the 10 and 2 positions and try to concentrate on forward and back, the top of the rod will bend and hit the spots. Most folks try for what they think is 10 and t2 and end up with 9 and 3. You want more of a push pull action and keep that wrist straight. Also remember to load the rod you want to accelerate to a quick stop. Hitting the 40-50 ft range is doable with just a good cast. To get past into the 70-100ft range you'll need to know how to haul the line. If you make it out to the valley you should give Bergler a shout. I don't know if he actually gives official lessons as I tend to just mooch pointers off of him. :)
 

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fundamentals

Well Bravo 252,now you've done it....!welcome to the world of Fly Casting and then there is fly fishing!
I teach fly casting and fly fishing to hundreds of men and women every year:in fact almost every day;..."to become a fly fisher you must master a few of the fundamenatals of fly casting."The other replys are correct,the most important item is practice,but,you need to know what to hell you are practising! Do not practice with that line,(tip system)it is a fishing line,not necessarily a casting line. Buy yourself an easy to cast Weight Forward floating line with a colour change incorporated IE: "Loop Opti-stream(BEST FOR TEACHING)",Hardy Mach 1 Trout,Greys Platinum XD ,and others from major manufacturers. Otherwise,I would suggest if you get one without the colour change, find the sweet spot (back end of the weight forward taper) and mark it with a black magic marker,6 or 8 inch strip.This is the optimum loading location on the line for a single pick-up. Remember,the best casters in the world make it look easy;because it is! The so called back-cast is really an up-cast,begin your cast with the rod tip touching the water or grass(tip down)...gradually pick up the rod/line making sure the line has constant tension,increase speed gradually or accelerate gradually,then from 10-11 o:clock a greater acceleration is used and a distinct stop is applied at 11 and then you follow through to about 1 o:clock or perhaps 2.Your line will be travelling at about a 45degree angle and will have enough speed to effectively load your rod and this angle gives you enough time to prepare for your forward cast segment. Remember Gravity has effect on al things. If your rod is "swooshing" you are working too hard!When you feel the line load you are about ready to begin you forward motion,,do bend the rod tip against the line load ,like a pole vaulter,let the rod do the work; Accelerate gradually with the tip bending and do have a distinct stop at about 10:30 or so,and follow through. Remember,always begin your cast with the rod tip down,see the sweet spot,gradual accelerations,distinct stops and follow throughs,don't work too hard and practice no more than 15 minutes at a time(important) we go brain dead!The pick up sets up the entire cast..make sure your wrist isn't bending too much and bring your arm back into a comfortable position with your shoulders and hand slightly higher than your shoulders;eye level.
With an agressive pick-up,you throw the line behind you onto the grass or other surfaces,resulting with a disasterous forward cast and the fly hitting you on the back Practice looking at your cast,follow it back. There are 2 types of casters;those that look behind and those that don't...both correct. By the Way...Steve Rajeff watches his cast...interesting ;many time world distance champ'
 

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Wow now theres some step-to-step instructions!

Nice post SalaR :)
 

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Slow down

The greatest problem I have with Male casters is to get them to slow down and feel the load...with women it is ironically the other...rod flex !? This applies to both single and two Handed casts..
Would love to do some casting demos in the new year...
C
 
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