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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed something in my short span as a flyfisher. I have more luck trolling in my belly boat than I do casting when on stillwater. In hopes of getting some hints that might help me narrow my pursuit of more hookups on casting let me suggest why I think I'm failing at catching fish when casting.

1.) Too much splashing: As I cast out and allow more line to shoot each time it hits the water. I've altered this slightly by casting and false casting over a different area than where I intend to present the fly and only only the final cast redirecting it to where I want. Possibly this other casting is spooking many fish in the surrounding area. I hook up with dry flies when casting more often than wet.

2.) I'm stripping incorrectly: I've read the books and articles and vary my stripping depending on what I'm using.I realize that one would fish a scud and a leach and chronie completely different. Maybe I'm still doing something wrong (speed, consistency)??? I would tend to think that a smooth consistent motion would be less attractive across the board than the surging stripping would give.

3.) Incorrect presentation: My leaders are too long/too short and the monofilament that I use as tippet doesn't unravel in a straight line as well. I didn't think this mattered as much with wet fly presentation though.

In any case, it is exhausting to have to kick around an area to catch when I could cast in a 360 degree circle and cover much more ground.


Maybe it's time for a casting course???
 

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It's most likely #2. Get Brian Chan's book "Fly Fishing Trout Lakes" it's a fantastic resource that covers off all your concerns.

Page 58 tells you how to presetn and retreive each type of fly. I actually carry a photocopy of the page in my shirt pocket while tubing to refer to while fishing
 

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I agree its #2 along with proper depth,its always best to use a count down.I often forget my depth after my first one on,then I have to start over :? Another great book is by Gordon Honey on small lakes.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
nostrildamus Posted: Monday 14th of August 2006 12
1.) Too much splashing: As I cast out and allow more line to shoot each time it hits the water.
This can be a problem if you're sight casting the the shallows, or in super clear water..Perhaps building up better line speed thus cutting down on false casts.

2.) I'm stripping incorrectly: I've read the books and articles and vary my stripping depending on what I'm using.I realize that one would fish a scud and a leach and chronie completely different. Maybe I'm still doing something wrong (speed, consistency)??? I would tend to think that a smooth consistent motion would be less attractive across the board than the surging stripping would give.
I've personally found retrieving is a lot of trial and error. Outside of Chironomids I like to keep the retreival eratic. Check out Brian Chan's DVD...He goes through how he strips each fly with sucsess.

In any case, it is exhausting to have to kick around an area to catch when I could cast in a 360 degree circle and cover much more ground.
I find casting from a pontoon or a boat much different and easier than in a tube. A casting course is always a good bet just to kill any bad habits.

Finder :wink:
 

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Fish Locale?

I think one factor you didn't list is that when trolling in a tube/pontoon/boat/whatever is that you are covering more lake, and if knowing WHERE the fish are likely to be is an issue, trolling may well expose your fly to more fish. When I was new to lakes this was definately an issue that made trolling more effective for me. On new lakes, it often still is.
 
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