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Hi,

I am presently just beginning my search for a good pair of waders. Like most folks...price is a factor but not the only consideration. I will be using these waders for work purposes also...in environmental data gathering...wading through swamp land and such.

For this reason I will obviously be considering the total comfort and durability of the waders. So far I have been reading about the Simms G3 guides with the stocking foot. I know very little about these and the only pair I have owned previously were neoprene waders.

Simms makes a big deal about the seams being in the front and rear of the leg and not on the sides. Does anybody have any experience with that? How about a zip up front?

Please suggest any waders you think might be of good quality and priced aggressively.

Another question is wading boots. Do I need to buy a size larger than my standard boot size 9 ?

Thanks for the help.

Jim
 

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If you are getting breathables for work - be prepared for them to not last very long...as any hard-core hiker-fisher can attest, even the most reputable and durable fishing waders will get thrashed if used daily for trekking through all hell. I have yet to have a set of rain gear last an entire summer of forestry work, so if you bash the bush like I do, be prepared for a couple hundred dollar heartbreak if you wear your waders for work.

That being said, I'd go with a company or shop that offers extremely good customer service since you'll likely put a few holes in them. I've been happy with the Snowbee breathables, and even more so with the service at Nile Creek. ;) thanks for all the glue and patches C. My legs are now dry, so it's on to the feet!!!

Now that being said, I do not treat my waders nicely, likely much much much worse than they were intended to be used. Fishing waders are just that - fishing waders intended for walking on paths or in the river, not falling in log jams, bashing through brambles, and generally making your own trail through underbrush.

If you can get in touch with people who do electro-shocking, you might get the usual advise - get a set of Simms or Bare. I guess Bare made a set of breathables when the whole idea came about around 10 years ago, but they made them so well that there were nearly indestructible, so they stopped making them.

As far as the seams go - fewer seams is better, and yes, it is good to NOT have any inside seams - they rub, then wear, then leak/fall apart.

I love my breathables, but I'm prepared to get a new set every 12-18 months of fishing since I ABUSE them. If I had a job that would buy them for me for work, then I'd take what I got, but I'll certainly go back to Snowbee once mine fall apart completely. So far, after ~9 months of steady abuse the only leaks in the breathable material has been from hooking myself, and those are now patched. My feet didn't start to leak until about 6 months went by, mid-winter of course, but that seems to be the run of the mill for neoprene stocking feet. I'll just glue up the seams and likely that will solve the problem, I've found that neoprenes tend to leak in the feet if you do a lot of walking in them, especially if you dont keep 100% of the sand and grit out of your boots. My old set of neos had leaky feet too after a year until I discovered glue (duct tape didnt work at all ;)) But that sand and grit does do damage to the neoprene - of course we all keep the gravel out of our boots !

Apparently there may be some models of breathables which are boot foot instead of stocking foot which may solve the leaky foot issue, but I dislike wearing gumboots while hiking, so likely you will want the stocking foot.

Good luck - what ever you go with, post a review - especially how many days of use and what issues you encountered and how much abuse they took.

:2cents:
 

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I have the reddington CPX waders and I think that they are great. Real comfy and just love the zipper. I haven't had them long enough to beat the hell out of them,but in time.
When I got them there was a problem with the taped seams on the boots leaking. I took them back and they gave me a new pair. No problems now, I hope. I talked to the reddington rep at the trade show about this and he said that the problem was completely corrected.
 

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Cool, good to hear that the CPX are working well - gotta love the zip-fronts!

Might be good to start a "best-by-test" blog for breathable waders. It seems that lots of us have them in different styles and by different brands. It also seems that some of us bushwhack a lot while others just beach fish or walk the trails/gravel bars....and some of us want to use them for field work!!!
 

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Also, I think some fly shops give discounts to people who are using their equipment for their work. I think Pacific Angler gives such a discount, but I'm not positive. It's like in my field, as an Architect, I get discounts for furniture, lighting, etc.
 

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Save yourself a few bucks and hold out for a second hand pair from one of the FF forums, if you can. If they have a few miles on them - send them back to the manufacturer for a new set (most have no-questions-asked return policies).

I've picked up a set of Cloudveil 8x and William Joseph Dri-Dynamic waders this way - traded them in for new - and paid less than $100/pair.
 

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I apply my code of ethics to how I treat individuals and the environment.
Everything else is just business.
I twist no arms and tell no lies - if $400+ for a pair of waders sounds fair to you, then far be it from me to question your ethics in buying them.

However, I present an alternative solution - if you think its underhanded, please feel free to disregard it.
 

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Ethics are how we carry ourselves through life.
It is generally part of my ethics not to be condescending towards others - however your mileage appears to vary.

As I wrote - if you have issue with my advice, feel free not to take it. If you have issue with myself personally, feel free to PM me, but please don't judge me, or my ethics as though you had any idea of who I am as a person - and I'll extend to you the same courtesy.
 

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My first pair of waders were Hodgeman All Purpose stockingfoot breathable's. I bought them from a company in the US. Good waders, very comfortable and lots of nice accessories (pockets etc.) At the end of last season I noticed that my feet were getting wet after a long day on the flow. I tried aquaseal and it worked a bit but my feet were still getting wet. I contacted Hodgeman Canada but they would not take the waders back for repair, this model is not available here. They wouldn't even take them back and charge me for the repair!! I contacted Hodgeman in the states and as long as I had a US address to ship from they would have a look at them. Lucky I have relatives in Idaho so off they went. In the meantime I picked up a pair of Simms G3's and after 8 months I am still really happy with them (dry feet is a good thing). Comfortable, durable and good accessories. To my suprise I received a parcel from my relatives in Idaho about a month ago and inside was a brand new pair of Hodgeman waders. Very nice. My advice to you is whatever brand you end up with buy locally. My lesson learned. You might pay a bit more but they will take care of you if something goes wrong. Also you asked about boot size. I wear a size 11 shoe but ended up with a 13 wading boot. Try them on with a neoprene bootie before you buy.
Good luck.
 

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You will find that in almost all cases, the rule of thumb is that you buy your wading boots 2 sizes larger than your actual shoe size. This alows for the thickness of the stocking foot of the wader and still allows your feet to remain comfy and not get cramped.

dave
 

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You will find that in almost all cases, the rule of thumb is that you buy your wading boots 2 sizes larger than your actual shoe size. This alows for the thickness of the stocking foot of the wader and still allows your feet to remain comfy and not get cramped.

dave
That is a good practice...as a retailer I will suggest for clients to increase the size of their boots but in most cases they are used to TIGHT>>that is often coupled with ANkle Support,however not necessarily the truth..Tight boots will cause early deterioration of the Neoprene surface ,hence leaks..and Neoprene doesn't like to be played with as far as sealants goes.Once they start leaking they usually won't stop! The best alternative and most safe are Boot Foot Waders...we citizens of North America seem to have had a poor view of BootFoot waders,the rest of the world have a somewhat different view of Neo' feet. For Lake fishers that use flippers Neo Feet are the norm........for a few years Snowbee actually built waders with PVC feet that were incredible...never leaked...but the market wasn't ready for this breakthrough so these were discontinued...(I kept a couple of pair for myself-my original waders are now 4 years old)...and a nice thing about boot foot waders is that you never forget your boots,you can comfortably add extra socks and foot warmers...and so much more..but they do look funny until you are in the water
C
 

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The first pair of breathables I had were Orvis bootfoot waders. I have yet to find a pair of waders as comfortable. The beauty about these waders was the boots were lace up boots and had very sturdy soles. I have looked on line, and Orvis and LL Bean seem to be the only companies that make lace up bootfoot waders that I can find. Are the Snobees a lace up type?
 

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The first pair of breathables I had were Orvis bootfoot waders. I have yet to find a pair of waders as comfortable. The beauty about these waders was the boots were lace up boots and had very sturdy soles. I have looked on line, and Orvis and LL Bean seem to be the only companies that make lace up bootfoot waders that I can find. Are the Snobees a lace up type?
If I could find something like that, I'd never go back. I've used laceup rubber caulked boots for forestry work and they are indestructable and water tight, but best of all much more comfortable and supportive than the ole gumboot style fit that most boot-foot waders offer. If you walk a lot and dont have the right socks on for a good fit then blisters await with gummers...not to mention more twisted ankles due to a near complete lack of ankle support...but if all you're up to is hitting the beach or taking short, easy walks, then gummers are great. I like that the boot foot is easier to get your waders off than stocking foot!
 

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I first bought a pair of Simms gortex waders after a long time of considering what I needed in a wader..I have rather big calf's after a very long time of weight lifting with my feet...anyway, that is were the problem lies..Simms is a bit to snug, but quite bearable, until it is time to remove them...lol..so I went hunting for another pair..and lady luck fell on me..got a pair of Hodgeman..great wader with room and the price was even better than I expected..paid $75 bucks for a brand new pair from here as a matter of fact..in the classifieds...been using them ever since..this spring and summer will tell me if I made a good choice or not...And...I also take a size 11 shoe...so my wading boots [Korker's guides] are size 13..always as a rule...2 sizes above what ur shoe size is.............AW
 
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