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Discussion Starter #1
I am interested in adding some marks on my fly line and backing to estimate how much is out. Has anyone ever done this? I am hesitant to simply use a sharpie because I am worried that it might damage the line, or am I just being paranoid?

Thanks.
 

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You could use the 'milestones' or features of your fly line to know how much line is out. For example, if you have a double tapered line, check the manufacturers specs to determine the length of front taper, body, rear taper, etc. You can feel these milestones in the line as you're casting and once you know how long they are, you'll easily be able to know how much line you have out.
 

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Just cast a line on a grassy area and when the line is out, measure it. Make a mental note of this. Cast different lengths and you will get an idea of how much line is out.
 

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I've used a sharpie before to mark the loading point on a home made skagit line, and so far no issues. If you put marks deep in your running line, do you think it matters much if you have some minor line damage as long as the core is still intact - say a mark every 10 feet for the last 30 feet (assuming your line is 90feet and you can cast 60feet and want to know if you are getting up nearer to 70, 80 and 90 feet). I wouldnt worry if you do something line that. I've landed coho, bull trout and lake trout on that home made skagit line and have used the line for 2 years and it still has many years left in it.
 

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I wouldn't bother to mark a line. Can I cast to where the fish is? I don't quite see the point of measuring the distance. When I come off the water and am talking to my buddies, I will tell them about the one monster that was rising 75' away, and that I was able to drop a size 18 Adams right on his nose, landing the biggest trout ever taken out of the Skagit. If I actually could measure the distance (ro the size of the fish), it would change the whole story. We aren't your girl friend, so we don't believe you no matter how long you tell us your cast is. :peace: Iused to mark my anchor ropes before I got a fish finder, so I could tell the depth I was anchored in. Permanent markers have very volatile solvents as part of their formula, and will do damage to your line's coating at the very least. Maybe not much, but why do any damage for no real good reason but ego.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am not as interested in measuring casting distance as I am in trying to reach a particular depth when using sinking lines. When I use a depth sounder or anchor rope that tells me the bottom is 30m down and I am trying to get down there to that depth, I want to be there. I often cast as far as I can, then let line pay out even until I reach backing, do some mental guestimation based on what I think is the amount of line out and an estimate of the IPS sink rate of the line and the angle the line, having a good estimate of the amount of line out would aide this.
 

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ya, I bet those solvents do terrible things to the coating of your line, but I figure that running line can take the abuse. I only really care if the head and tip float well, the running line takes a beating any way - stepped on, tangled in rocks, twigs etc, so the health of the coating is the least of my worries. As long as the core stays strong and doesnt snap when I've got that 10lb trout on after making a 90ft cast, who cares ;)

by the way, I don't mark the distance of my line, but I do mark what feels like a good loading point on some of my experimental chopped lines.

i also got damn reel oil all over several of my floaters, so they are stained red in random spots. So far no detrimental effects except for the colour.
 

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Let's see if I got this right, you want to know how deep your line is. If as you say , you are in 30m of water; that is almost 100 ft. the way I see it you would need to have 300 ft. of line out to give you 3 to 1 ratio and get you to the bottom. I don't know how much backing you got on your reel but I hope it's a lot.This is figured if you are trolling. If you are anchored, you would need to put all your flyline out plus some of your backing just to get straight down as there is going to be some belly in your line. Deep fishing. I made up some line extensions that are basically just tips made of lead core line for when I want to go real deep. Made some up in different lengths. they work but are a real bear to cast.
 

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I marked my line with a sharpie when I was learning how to cast. It just made me feel better when I could tell I was making good headway. This was 3 years ago and I am still using the same line so there is no worries there.
 

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I am not as interested in measuring casting distance as I am in trying to reach a particular depth when using sinking lines. When I use a depth sounder or anchor rope that tells me the bottom is 30m down and I am trying to get down there to that depth, I want to be there. I often cast as far as I can, then let line pay out even until I reach backing, do some mental guestimation based on what I think is the amount of line out and an estimate of the IPS sink rate of the line and the angle the line, having a good estimate of the amount of line out would aide this.
When I want to get a chironomid to a certain depth, I clamp my forceps to the hook, lower the line to the bottom and reel in so the hook will be above bottom by a foot or two then I use a whiteout marker on the line at the first guide. The stuff will wipe off without much trouble and is persistent when wetted. Not sure if that will help you or not.
 

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Like Btree, I also mark my lines with a sharpie pen. I have a few sharpie marks on my fly-line so I can adjust my cast to the amount of line I have out. However, for my next fly-line I will use fly tying thread for my markings.
 

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I would think that Marking with a "Sharpie" would breakdown your line.

Personally, I would happy knowing that I'm casting where the fish are. I think also that accuracy and presentation would be more important than distance.

Worry about accuracy and presentation first.
 
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