BC Fly Fishing Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to beach fishing and am trying to understand tides and how they relate to fishing for cutthroat. Do you find success dependent upon tide more so than time of day? Do you tend to have better success on an incoming tide vs. an outgoing tide? I've noticed that of two low tides each day, one is much lower than the other. Is fishing one of these low tides more productive than the other? I've read that fishing an incoming tide is more productive, but at the same time on some forums I read that some people comment on how they've had a good day fishing an outgoing tide. It's all a little confusing. Can any one here help educate me about tides? Thanks kindly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,608 Posts
Hi Cameron...
A very good post...Tides can be confusing as heck..Most of the time just before High flood and during the flood are the best what you need to realize is that the Food sources are the major player here...during a very high tide the Trout will cruise the beach only several feet of the shoreline where insects and fry have gathered to eat or be eaten. This time of year when the fry are coming down all the streams and entering the estuaries can be awesome...later when the summer approaches cutties are still as hungry and will attack anything within their sight....
When you have an outgoing tide the many foodsources scatter about differently and are less easy to pinpoint. With a very low tide,sometimes falling as much as 14' the low slack can produce stellar fishing...the small weeed beds are almost exposed and all the little creatures are exposed much more than they are used to. If you are fishing a high tide look for the floating debris that moves along just off the shoreline...you will see the many small fry hiding in there jumping about because they are being "FOOD"...so,for the next couple of months have fun...as summer apprioaches Dry Fly action is really where it's at for me..
C
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the explanation, SalaR. Would it be fair to expect that fishing during an incoming tide might be productive? I'm assuming that the force of the water would be bring food with it that the cutthroat would be following in. Or is it more complicated than that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
it depends on the dynamics of the beach you are fishing, and how high the high tide is eg. 9 ft versus 14+ ft fishes very differently in terms of where the fish will be feeding. In my experience two hours before through two hours after the high tide in the afternoon/evening is best but I fish a specific LML beach stretch all season so I know that stretch well. my best advice is to find a good area and fish it as much as you can until you know it very well and can understand the specific dynamics of the area inside and out whether it's cloudy/sunny/windy/calm and throughout the various tides, and keep a log book of every trip with tides and weather....sorry if this doesn't sound simple but I have been fishing the same beach since I was 9 and every year I think I know everything about beach fishing and every year I am forced to adapt my approach a little bit
hope this helps
Len
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Len. I'll definitely be going out to try and figure it all out. I'll be trying some of the beaches close to home and will see if I can't make some sense of what works and what doesn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,012 Posts
I just finished watching an episode of Sportfishing on the Fly and they were fishing for cutties off Tofino. A good episode with really good info about tides, etc. It was episode 20.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I tied up a half dozen of those fry flies and added them to my arsenal. I was out on one of the North Shore beaches this afternoon for a couple of hours and saw nothing but a seal who was bobbing off shore from me for the time I was there. Probably waiting for me to catch something so he could come steal it. I guess we were both skunked today.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
If you're off the North Shore, you might want to chat up the Capilano hatchery people and find you when they kick out all their fry! That will spell a feeding frenzy for the cutties, if there are any left off the north shore.

Also, on another thread in this forum, a member spells out where to look for fish in estuaries based on tide action. Even has a nice colour coded map!

http://www.flyfishbc.com/forums/threads/3074-New-to-Beach-Fishing?highlight=estuary


Or you can just use the search function - I searched for "estuary" and got lots of hits relating to your interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
''Sea runs alway keep us learning as do most sea trout , but the sea run cutthroat? He will keep me on my toes ,till my legs fail me .Every river ,and every creek have there own .to hold and catch and try to understand .But the tieds may be there home ,and who may learn the tieds ?may know the sea run cutthroat .''
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Purchase a copy of Steve Raymond's "The Estuary Fly fisher" - tremendous info for the sea-run fisherman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
As others have said, each beach is different, however, I prefer the flood tide and time my outings accordingly. Typically I like to fish the last couple of hours of a flood tide, around the slack and even into the ebb.

Cutts follow their prey. It's my theory (and it's only a theory) that the flood tide draws the baitfish out of the offshore eelgrass beds and into the rocks and sand along the shore as the fresh cool water stirs up the marine life in the intertidal zone for the baitfish to feed on. And the predators follow...

It's just a theory. Anyways, IMHO, a beach full of water is just prettier to fish.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top